How Family Work Changed Our Lives. There is always hope. Part 1

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During Carers Week we are sharing stories of hope, courage and challenge carers face every day.  Mum and Daughter Ginny and Hannah Slack have a remarkable relationship. Hannah’s physical and mental health have at times impacted on the family and she also hears voices.  Ginny supports Hannah and Hannah supports Ginny.

Ginny commented, ‘first of all and more importantly, Robert, my late husband could not accept Hannah’s diagnosis. Hannah’s siblings could not understand what was going on in Hannah’s head and because one of the voices happened to be the voice of her sister Hannah’s sibling found herself excluded from family life due to the difficulties around this. Naturally she felt rejected.  This voice was negative and it affected everyday life in lots of ways.

As a Mum, I thought I was muddling along quite well until I was put in touch with the Family Interventions Team. This was a turning point. A lady called Andrea Emmens came to see us and I cried.  It was such a release and I needed to do it. When Andrea came into our lives it was a turning point. We can’t tell you how important the Family Intervention Team has been for us. As time on went we also received support via Jo who worked with my late husband Robert. She helped my husband to accept Hannah’s illness. I will never forget them. They were marvellous.  I started to learn how to empathise with my daughter. Community Psychiatric Nurses helped too and Andrea also worked with Hannah and introduced her to Peter Bullimore *to help her live with the voices she hears’.

Our lives have completely changed due to the interventions. Relationships in our family are back to being as close as they ever were and more. We are strengthened as a family. Thank you’.

Look out for part 2 in July 2017  when Ginny and Hannah share their experiences of volunteering and how Carers Support Groups can be a life line.

Family Interventions Team for Adult Mental Health.  

Andrea Emmens – Family Interventions Coordinator, Mental Health Unit, Bassetlaw Hospital, Worksop Notts, S80 0BD

Tel: 01909 502025

Enquiries: bftenquiries@nottshc.nhs.uk   Twitter @Familywork123

Alyson Leeks Family Interventions Co-ordinator (Mon-Wed) Manor Road, Gedling,

Tel: 07824835292

More information -Peter-Bullimore  Peter Bullimore works in a clinical way with people that have mental health difficulties. Peter heard his first voice aged seven. He delivers training to mental health professionals, carers and support workers

 

Nottinghamshire Healthcare Carers Week Pledge 2017

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Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust will work with staff teams to complete year two of the Triangle of Care. In doing so, we will continue to improve how staff support, involve and communicate with unpaid carers.

We will continue to build a carer friendly trust by training more staff in carer awareness and share relevant information with staff to enable them to signpost carers to the information they need via our website and through face to face contact

https://www.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/families-and-carers

We will show our carers awareness films to more staff  to highlight some of the challenges they face and promote partnership working with carers and families

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPWD1p1V9Cw

https://www.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/carers-films

We will remember to appreciate and thank unpaid carers more often for their generosity, expertise and the time they give freely to our Trust

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Clinical staff building skills to work with families.

Behavioural Family Therapy Training

 

In January and March of this year , 22 Trust clinical staff completed a training course in Behavioural Family Therapy.  The training is delivered by Adult Mental Health staff and supported by a small team of carers and service users who share their experiences, describing the impact of mental health difficulties on the whole family. There is no written assessment during the training and a variety of approaches to learning are used, including; group work, discussions, observing family sessions and giving feedback.

Natasha Batty- Charge Nurse at Lucy Wade Unit, Millbook described her experience.
‘I had some apprehensions about carrying out the BFT training after being informed that it relied heavily on role play, however, the team were wonderful in alleviating our anxieties and I actually found the role play incredibly beneficial in completing the training! The training was very well conducted and, although intense, equipped us with the skills necessary to be confident in carrying this work out. I currently work on an inpatient ward within the Trust but hope to be able to begin implementing the principles of family work with service users that I work with’.
The training sessions are held in Nottingham and Rampton Hospital. Over a quarter of the clinical staff in Adult Mental Health have now completed the course. Family work has been identified within the Trust Recovery Strategy as a strong evidence base for the effectiveness of family work both locally and internationally. After completing the training, staff members are encouraged to attend monthly group supervision sessions and annual Refresher Days which are run by the Family Interventions Team. These days give staff the chance to discuss concerns, maintain confidence and share good practise.

This course is open to clinical staff working in the Adult Mental Health directorate. If you would like to apply for a place on a future course please contact: bftenquiries@nottshc.nh.uk

Stage 1 Triangle of Care Gold Star!

The Triangle of Care submission to The Carers Trust  has been approved! In September 2016 we were awarded a gold star for completing Phase 1.

A group from the Trust presented their journey to build a carer friendly trust to the regional meeting held in Derby. This included a detailed report on how the Trust currently works with carers and our ambitions for the future. Really listening to carers and acting on what they say to improve our services means we can improve our partnerships and relationships. To do this we need to be prepared to co-produce more of our services together going into Stage 2 of The Triangle of Care.

64 self-assessments for 74 ward and crisis teams were part of the submission. Trust teams were asked to fill in a self-assessment saying what they are doing currently in their work with carers and to be candid on what they need to improve on.

 

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Head of Involvement – Paul Sanguinazzi sharing our journey with the Midlands Triangle of Care Regional Group, Kingsway,  Derby.

There was praise from The Carers Trust in how our staff are involving carers, the continuity and leadership of approach, plus the production of a Carers and Confidentiality Guide and carer awareness film for staff. They commented on how we were using Carer Feedback to improve services particularly via Patient Opinion  as being a valuable way to evidence our improvements.

The Carers  Federation  supported us every step of the way as our partner organisation for the submission..  Watch out for stage 2. The journey is not over yet…..

Special thanks to The Carers Strategy Group, Trevor Clower – Carer, Rob Gardiner – The Carers Federation and Trust Governor. Paul Sanguinazzi – Head of Involvement and all staff and carers who worked tirelessly to get us to this stage.

Jane Danforth –  Involvement & Experience Officer

Triangle of Care is Good to Go!

by Rachel Murnaghan Carer, Involvement Volunteer & Service User

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At the end of April  I spent a fantastic day at The Nottingham Involvement Centre with staff and carers across the Trust. It was an interesting collaboration and the purpose was to look at the self assessments forms which give a snapshot of where we are at the moment in our  work across the Trust and how our teams are involving carers, families and friends. The Triangle of Care approach was developed by carers and staff to improve carer involvement in inpatient and home treatment services as well as  giving examples of good practice. It recommends better partnership working between service users and their carers, and organisations.

There are six standards to achieve.

1) Carers are identified at first contact or as soon as possible.

2) Staff are ‘carer aware’ and trained in carer engagement strategies.

3) Policy and protocols re: confidentiality and sharing information, are in place.

4) Defined post(s) responsible for carers are in place.

5) A carer introduction to the service and staff is available, with a range of information across the care pathway.

6) A range of carer support services is available.

I really enjoyed the sharing of best practice and the good work done by our Trust teams to date. This boost for staff morale should encourage them into their future work with carers.

During the day I  heard about how teams such as the Crisis Team for CAMHS (Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services) and the gender clinic  are working with carers and their families.

We looked at some of the familiar themes coming up in the self assessments. Issues carers want to improve include support and communication with carers, lack of training for staff and how we need to share the news that we have Trust  Staff Carer Champions who are leading on how we work with carers.

More work is still needed on guidance around policies and what information staff  can share with carers. There is a new guide coming out soon about this. Sometimes it seems there is little support and compassion for carers and suitable signposting to other services.

Some carers like to use websites and they are a great idea to keep the information up to date but don’t forget those who can’t use technology. There are still issues for  our Trust staff knowing about who provides carers assessments and their information isn’t always up to date.

I just wanted to share a short part of what was a very busy day.  We have carers involved in the decision making processes and I felt really positive at the end. We have made a good start to  including carers, families and friends across the Trust

 

Hello, my name is Mike.

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Mike at the CPA Good Practice Awards

Hello, my name is Mike.  I’m a volunteer at  Rosewood Involvement Centre in Ollerton. I started attending two years ago, when I was caring for a close family member with depression.

As everyone who has been a carer will know, it can be a time to show people how much you love and care for them, but it can also have incredibly negative effects on your own well-being.  The loss of the person you once knew, the fading away of your social life and free time, the increased stress, anxiety and isolation… all this can have alarming consequences for your own physical and emotional health.

That’s why it is essential that carers can have quality time for themselves, where they can be just like anyone else. Rosewood was just such a place for me. When I began attending,  I was unsure what to expect. I was made to feel at home and it was not long before I was fully immersed in the world of Involvement.

Being able to see that there were other people just like me assuaged my sense of loneliness and isolation. Learning that there were others who suffered badly from mental health conditions and recovered to live a normal life gave me hope for the future. I began to attend every session I could.

Making friends and getting away from my caring role was not the only benefit of Involvement. I was able to access a number of training opportunities which greatly enriched my personal and professional development. This included  Involvement Interview Training which consisted of a course learning how to conduct an interview. Once trained, I participated in interviews for potential Trust employees as part of a patient/carer panel. You can learn a lot to use for your own future experiences as an interviewee!

I was able to attend Training sessions to ensure best practice in the workplace such as safeguarding children and vulnerable adults, equality & diversity, manual handling and back care, deaf awareness, and food hygiene and safety.

I have been given the opportunity to tell my story of caring to a number of audiences, including Trust staff members. This is very important to me since you are in a position to advise staff on what works well and what could be done better. Any opportunity to help shape attitudes and practice is vital. After this, I was able to participate in the Care Programme Approach (CPA) training, which involved delivering a presentation.

Training played a part in  finding a role I love where I can use my experience to help others. I began this role in August 2014. Around the same time, the person whom I cared for made a full recovery from their  illness. Recovery is an on-going process, but there has been no relapse and our lives have returned to normal; full of health and happiness.

However, I know that this is not always the outcome; for many people with mental ill-health. It is something they have to face on a daily basis and often for the rest of their lives. Their well-being is no less important than mine. That is the reason why I still volunteer; advocating the role of Involvement in ensuring best practice within the Trust.

I stood for the role of Public Governor in the 2015 elections. To my surprise and gratitude, I was elected for three years!  I’m looking forward to advocating my views, holding the leadership to account, and hopefully inspiring other people in my former position to see that, yes, things can get better. We must never stop working to better the lives of those with mental health issues, and those who care for them.

Carers Christmas fuddle Bassetlaw Hospital

The input of Carers, Families and Friends are vital to the work of the Involvement Team. Ingrid is an Involvement Volunteer and is regarded with great affection  as ‘The Rosewood Mum’ at The Rosewood Involvement Centre in Ollerton. She is a lady with a big heart  always thinking of others before herself. She has actively campaigned for carers to be included in all aspects of care and was responsible for the inclusion of a carers information leaflet for all carers and families with loved ones arriving for the first time on Bassetlaw Mental Health Wards. This was based on her own experience and what she wanted to know as a new carer arriving for the first time on a ward with a family member knowing absolutely nothing about Adult Mental Health Services. Ingrid is a member of  The Story Shop  and participates in many other volunteering activities. She is an invaluable member of the Involvement Volunteering team. Thank You Ingrid.

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Ingrid  AKA “Rosewood Mum”

Ingrid has written her thoughts on the Bassetlaw  Hospital Christmas event for carers.

”It was just fantastic! We had a very tasteful buffet , some carers had made their own dishes  which were delicious.

We had a mindfulness group for about 45mins which was really relaxing.

Then, to follow a harpist followed by the Rosewood Rockers (Vlas, Alan and Eric. So we had a good old sing song of favourites and some Christmas songs.

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The Rosewood Rockers

All in all everybody really enjoyed themselves, a great afternoon.

Thank you to all who gave their time for us Carers, its much appreciated.”

INGRID🐤🐣🐓🐔🐥