How Family Work Changed Our Lives. There is always hope. Part 1

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During Carers Week we are sharing stories of hope, courage and challenge carers face every day.  Mum and Daughter Ginny and Hannah Slack have a remarkable relationship. Hannah’s physical and mental health have at times impacted on the family and she also hears voices.  Ginny supports Hannah and Hannah supports Ginny.

Ginny commented, ‘first of all and more importantly, Robert, my late husband could not accept Hannah’s diagnosis. Hannah’s siblings could not understand what was going on in Hannah’s head and because one of the voices happened to be the voice of her sister Hannah’s sibling found herself excluded from family life due to the difficulties around this. Naturally she felt rejected.  This voice was negative and it affected everyday life in lots of ways.

As a Mum, I thought I was muddling along quite well until I was put in touch with the Family Interventions Team. This was a turning point. A lady called Andrea Emmens came to see us and I cried.  It was such a release and I needed to do it. When Andrea came into our lives it was a turning point. We can’t tell you how important the Family Intervention Team has been for us. As time on went we also received support via Jo who worked with my late husband Robert. She helped my husband to accept Hannah’s illness. I will never forget them. They were marvellous.  I started to learn how to empathise with my daughter. Community Psychiatric Nurses helped too and Andrea also worked with Hannah and introduced her to Peter Bullimore *to help her live with the voices she hears’.

Our lives have completely changed due to the interventions. Relationships in our family are back to being as close as they ever were and more. We are strengthened as a family. Thank you’.

Look out for part 2 in July 2017  when Ginny and Hannah share their experiences of volunteering and how Carers Support Groups can be a life line.

Family Interventions Team for Adult Mental Health.  

Andrea Emmens – Family Interventions Coordinator, Mental Health Unit, Bassetlaw Hospital, Worksop Notts, S80 0BD

Tel: 01909 502025

Enquiries: bftenquiries@nottshc.nhs.uk   Twitter @Familywork123

Alyson Leeks Family Interventions Co-ordinator (Mon-Wed) Manor Road, Gedling,

Tel: 07824835292

More information -Peter-Bullimore  Peter Bullimore works in a clinical way with people that have mental health difficulties. Peter heard his first voice aged seven. He delivers training to mental health professionals, carers and support workers

 

Nottinghamshire Healthcare Carers Week Pledge 2017

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Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust will work with staff teams to complete year two of the Triangle of Care. In doing so, we will continue to improve how staff support, involve and communicate with unpaid carers.

We will continue to build a carer friendly trust by training more staff in carer awareness and share relevant information with staff to enable them to signpost carers to the information they need via our website and through face to face contact

https://www.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/families-and-carers

We will show our carers awareness films to more staff  to highlight some of the challenges they face and promote partnership working with carers and families

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPWD1p1V9Cw

https://www.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/carers-films

We will remember to appreciate and thank unpaid carers more often for their generosity, expertise and the time they give freely to our Trust

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Nurses Day: “Without them, I don’t believe I would still be alive”

12 May is Nurses’ Day, when Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust make a special effort to show appreciation to our nurses.  Joy Biddell wanted to share her story and say thank you to the nurses who made a huge difference to her recovery.

Here is our dedicated Trust blog site and an account of Joy’s journey

http://on-our-mind-notts.blogspot.co.uk/2017/05/nurses-day-without-them-i-dont-believe.html

Thank you to all the nurses involved in my care, you’re all very special people! Thank you for not giving up on me when I had completely given up on myself. You didn’t just see me as a patient but you saw and treated me like a person, and encouraged me to carry on and aspire to be the person I want to be. You made me realise that although I have an illness, it’s not the whole part of me and I have so much to give and live for. Carry on being incredible!

Clinical staff building skills to work with families.

Behavioural Family Therapy Training

 

In January and March of this year , 22 Trust clinical staff completed a training course in Behavioural Family Therapy.  The training is delivered by Adult Mental Health staff and supported by a small team of carers and service users who share their experiences, describing the impact of mental health difficulties on the whole family. There is no written assessment during the training and a variety of approaches to learning are used, including; group work, discussions, observing family sessions and giving feedback.

Natasha Batty- Charge Nurse at Lucy Wade Unit, Millbook described her experience.
‘I had some apprehensions about carrying out the BFT training after being informed that it relied heavily on role play, however, the team were wonderful in alleviating our anxieties and I actually found the role play incredibly beneficial in completing the training! The training was very well conducted and, although intense, equipped us with the skills necessary to be confident in carrying this work out. I currently work on an inpatient ward within the Trust but hope to be able to begin implementing the principles of family work with service users that I work with’.
The training sessions are held in Nottingham and Rampton Hospital. Over a quarter of the clinical staff in Adult Mental Health have now completed the course. Family work has been identified within the Trust Recovery Strategy as a strong evidence base for the effectiveness of family work both locally and internationally. After completing the training, staff members are encouraged to attend monthly group supervision sessions and annual Refresher Days which are run by the Family Interventions Team. These days give staff the chance to discuss concerns, maintain confidence and share good practise.

This course is open to clinical staff working in the Adult Mental Health directorate. If you would like to apply for a place on a future course please contact: bftenquiries@nottshc.nh.uk

Your Feedback is Being Heard!

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Update from Patient Opinion Subscriber Support Team

picture of Cally Bowman Posted by Cally Bowman, Patient Opinion Subscriber Support Officer

Sharing your feedback on Patient Opinion, no matter how small it might seem, is heard and can lead to a change. A lovely little example happened last week, when some parents shared stories about their experiences of attending “a family fun day during the Easter holidays” at Eastwood Children’s Centre.

Tina Hancock, Sure Start Children’s Centres Service Manager, listened to the feedback, discussed it with staff and posted a response to let the parents know that they were going to make a change thanks to the feedback. Tina explained…

“I have shared your comments on to the team about the food – and your comments have helped us to plan our next event where we will be offering an alternative catering arrangement that caters to more tastes” The staff have reviewed and evaluated your feedback which has led to a change to the way we provide lunch at our future events by providing a better timetable for eating.”

You can read the full stories and responses here: your-feedback-is-being-heard

This is great to see and goes to show that sharing even the small things can help make a difference for many people! Great work from Surestart and Notts Healthcare!

David is sharing his struggle with alcohol to inspire others to get help:

Today we are hosting a story from David  from our dedicated Trust  Nottinghamshire Healthcare Foundation Trust blog. On our Mind

Please read and share his inspiring story.

David had always enjoyed the occasional beer however, as his drinking steadily worsened during a difficult few years, it took its toll on his health. After a stay in hospital, he found himself supported by the Trust’s Alcohol Related Long Term Conditions Team and is now firmly on the road to recovery……… to read more here is   David’s Story of Recovery

Touched by Tesco

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Thomas Madar

Thomas Madar – Involvement Volunteer

Experiences of Life and Employment Part 4

My final assignment was worked out offices of this well-known supermarket chain located at an enormous depot occupying the south end of Hatfield. It covered the last six months of 2007, from high summer to the dead of winter. Work varied from updating legacy software to cope with the supermarket’s expansion to the decommissioning of outdated information systems.

My performance was good. Time and task management lessons learned from a previous assignment continued to be put into practice and I became well noted for my thoroughness of my work. However, this was an emotionally rough assignment for reasons which originated well outside the world of work.

Because of my past, I was very sensitive to being left out of conversations, or being ignored in small social groupings. On a Saturday outing to Matlock Bath which was organised by my local Christian Friendship Fellowship group, I experienced a prolonged period of being ignored by the other members of a small group of which I was a member. This upset me greatly. I suffered sustained feelings of social worthlessness and mood swings which lasted until well after the beginning of the following working week, and which impacted on my relationship with others in the working team.

My mood swings triggered off an attack of insomnia which lasted for several weeks. For days at a time, I woke in the small hours of the morning and was unable to return to sleep, with the result that I was fatigued for all of the following day. I suffered periods of drowsiness which were noticeable to my assignment manager. Whenever this happened, I was asked to leave my desk and take a walk around the offices in the hope that exercise and fresh air would keep me awake.

Eventually, my emotions settled down, and I began to sleep well again. But some damage must have been done because unlike with Barclays Bank, my six month contract was not extended. I was also reported to occupational health in the hope that something could be done to relieve any future outbreaks of this nature.

The End

Following the end of my Tesco assignment, I found myself on the Bench. The Bench was a reserve list of employees who were looking for assignments, but were currently unemployed. Recent rules stated that if an employee was on the Bench for more than two months, then a notice of redundancy would follow. Unfortunately, I was unable to find any subsequent assignments commensurate with my skill set, or which did not require a substantial amount of verbal interaction with Xansa clients. This eventually led to me being made redundant in the autumn of 2008.

Thomas is continuing to volunteer for us and in between searching for jobs is a valued member of our Involvement Team helping us to improve our feedback website functionality. http://feedback.nottinghamshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/